Adelaide Wheelchair Access Travel

Adelaide is the capital city of the state of South Australia, and the fifth-most populous city of Australia, with an estimated population of 1,333,927. The city was named in honour of Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, queen consort to King William IV, Founded in 1836, Adelaide was the planned capital for a freely-settled British province in Australia. Colonel William Light, one of Adelaide’s founding fathers, designed the city and chose its location close to the River Torrens, in the area originally inhabited by the Kaurna people. Light’s design set out Adelaide in a grid layout, interspaced by wide boulevards and large public squares, and entirely surrounded by parklands. It has been noted for early examples of religious freedom, a commitment to political progressivism and civil liberties. The city of Adelaide promotes ‘events tourism’ and people with disabilities frequently travel to events such as cricket at the Adelaide Oval and arts events such as the Adelaide Fringe and the World Music Festival. Adelaide wheelchair access is very good.

Adelaide has been known as the “City of Churches” since the mid-19th century, referring to its diversity of faiths rather than the piety.  The churches and gardens in the city are magnificent attractions for disability travel as well as non-disabled visitors.

Attractions and Opportunities

Adelaide Botanic Gardens 

Adelaide Central Market & City EcoCaddy Tour

Adelaide Zoo

Art Gallery of South Australia

Barossa Valley

Glenelg Beach

Himeji Garden 

Kangaroo Island

Migration Museum

North Terrace Cultural Precinct 

South Australian Museum

Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute

Victoria Square 

Transport

Adelaide Buses

Where to wait for a bus and how to board

Adelaide wheelchair access buses will stop at each of the timetabled city stops/zones within the CBD. For all other stops, just hail the bus. For customers who use a white cane or are accompanied by an assistance dog, the driver will stop and announce the bus route number. Reflective Ticket Wallets are issued to passengers who have a physical disability that is not obvious as they do not use a mobility device. These wallets enable you to indicate to approaching drivers that you require the ramp to be deployed in order to board bus. You can request a reflective ticket wallet through the Adelaide Metro InfoLine and it will be posted to you. If you require a ramp to board, you can request this. However you must be independently able to board or travelling with a companion who can assist you.

Where to wait for a train or tram and how to board

Train platforms have a boarding patch (indicated by a large painted white-on-blue International Symbol for Access) where you should wait for assistance from the driver or Passenger Service Assistant (PSA). These boarding points are located at the point where the first door of the leading car will stop. Also, in some cases you may be able to board directly as there may be no step or large gap. However If assistance is required the driver or PSA will be available to deploy the access ramp. At Adelaide Railway Station when you enter the accessible gate, the Customer Service Officers manning the gate can arrange for boarding assistance on request.

Reflective Ticket Wallets are issued to passengers who have a physical disability that is not obvious as they do not use a mobility device. These wallets enable you to indicate to approaching drivers that you require the ramp to be deployed in order to board the train or tram. Make sure you request a reflective ticket wallet through the Adelaide Metro InfoLine and it will be posted to you. 

Trams platforms have a boarding patch (indicated by a large painted white-on-blue International Symbol for Access) where you should wait for assistance when the tram is due from the driver or Passenger Service Assistant (PSA). These boarding points are located at the point where the first door of the leading car will stop. In some cases you may be able to board directly as there may be no step or large gap, but if assistance is required the driver or a PSA will be available to deploy the access ramp.

Please note that all tram stops are accessible except for the City South stop.
When funding is available the City South Tram stop will be reconfigured to provide better accessibility and amenity for our customers. 

When using a ramp to board a bus, train or tram

Position your mobility aid with wheels straight so you can ‘drive on’ via the ramp through the vehicle doorway. Ensure the stability brakes on of your mobility aid and safety for you and staff by keeping the wheels straight and not turning on the ramp.

Where to position onboard vehicles

All the Metro Adelaide wheelchair access vehicles have priority seating and allocated spaces. See the fact sheet for locations of these areas on the Accessibility and Disability page.

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